5 Things You Must Do to Find Your Lost Pet Thursday 28 September 2017 @ 08:38

Adorable dog with adult and boys We hear stories all the time from devastated families who have lost their pet and have no idea how to go about searching for them. To try and help you guys out, we’ve put together a list of five of the most important things you need to do when searching for your missing animal companion.

1. Postpone Any Unnecessary Commitments

Some things - like doctor’s appointments, funerals or graduations - can’t simply be cancelled or postponed whenever necessary. However, some things can. Laundry day, day trips and coffee dates are not as important as the life of your puppy, cat or feathered friend. If you have young kids to look after or older kids to cart to and from school, see if a friend or family member can do this for you for now.

If at all possible, it’d be very helpful to take a bit of time off work to search for your missing animal. If you have a big event that you have any chance of postponing - a wedding, a family holiday - this can wait as well. You need to give yourself as much free, flexible time as possible to look for your missing pet.

Cat with kittens 2. Start Spreading the News

To give your furry friend the best possible chance of being found, you need to get the fact that they’ve gone missing out there. Try making up posters and fliers with your contact information, information about rewards (if you can afford one) and a picture of your pet. Try to give a good, clear description of your animal so that he can be easily recognized, but do make a point of keeping one identifying characteristic a secret so that you can check if anyone claiming to have your animal is telling the truth.

With your posters ready, it’s time to spread them. Try putting them up all around the area in which they went missing. Information and fliers can be posted in town halls, animal shelters, mailbox clusters, vet offices, grocery stores - anywhere your poster can be seen by lots of people who might have relevant information. If you’ve recently moved house, you may also want to post fliers around the area you used to live, as many pets have an uncanny ability to reappear in the neighbourhoods they used to inhabit.

Tricolor Short Coat Dog Running3. Get Out There

As important as it is to have all of these extra eyes on the lookout for your missing pet, it’s also absolutely vital that you get outside yourself and call your missing animal by name. After all, your pet knows and trusts you, not all of these other strangers. It’s also a good idea to get friends and relatives - especially those who are familiar with your animal - to go out and search, canvas the community and talk to people.

Don’t try to predict where your pet will and won’t be: you don’t know, and you can’t know. All you can do is search, and the best time of day to do this is nighttime and dawn. These are the times your animal is most likely to be out and exploring because there are fewer people out and about. The reduced number of people also means it’s the time when your pet is most likely to hear you, and you’re most likely to hear your pet.

If you’re searching from your car, drive slowly while calling. Keep all of your windows rolled down and the radio turned off. Stop your car and turn off the engine every now and then to make listening easier.

Jordy4. Set up a Home from Home

If you’re keeping yourself busy searching for your missing pet, there’s a pretty high chance your house will be empty while you do this. So what happens if your missing pet decides to return while you’re out of the house?

A good way to deal with this conundrum is by setting up a home from home where your pet can stay until you return. Try placing a large cardboard box (big enough for your animal to hide in) upside down in your yard. Cut a hole in the side big enough for your animal to climb through, and cover its floor with your pet’s favourite bedding and toys.

Make sure the base of this box is weighed down enough that it won’t blow away so that this can be a safe place where your pet can wait for you. Place some water, food and a litter tray (if relevant) nearby. Not only will these creature comforts make this den a nice place to hide when your pet returns, but the scent of your animal’s toys, bedding and food may well attract them and help them find their own way home.

Ginger cat5. Register Your Pet with Lost Pet Finders

Finding your missing pet is quite literally our job. When you register your lost pet with us, you’re automatically opting in for our many free services. Once you’ve completed this registration, you’re also given an obligation-free quote which will show you how much it would cost to issue a Pet Alert in your area, which you can adjust to your liking.

The final price of your pet alert will vary depending on where you live, how large an area you wish to cover and how many people are available in the area for us to contact. If you opt into our paid services, you’ll also get the free bonus boost on your Facebook Pet Alert.

For more information on what to do if you’ve lost your pet, check out our top ten pet-finding tips, as well as our information on microchips and rewards.

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Pet of the Month: Jordy! Tuesday 29 August 2017 @ 09:40

The main topics we’ve covered over the past few months have been caring for shy cats, long-haired cats and rescue pets with abusive previous owners. We chose to discuss these issues in honour of our sponsored pets, Misty, Russia and Lucy.

Lucy, Misty and Russia were three pets we had the good fortune to sponsor through Hunter Animal Rescue, an amazing non-profit whose goal is to place pets - who have been abandoned and are facing euthanasia - in their forever homes. All of the pets rescued by this not-for-profit organisation are given foster homes where they are looked after until they find their new families, so nobody ends up in the pound. This means they get all the cuddles and love they could possibly want, even before they find their new homes.

This month, we’re continuing our new sponsorship tradition and sponsoring Jordy.

JordyMeet Jordy

Animal Number: 17002
Sex: Male (desexed)
DOB: 25/2/13
Size: Medium 25.5kg

Jordy is a loving, fun and super-active young Vizsla X (Kelpie/Bully) who loves a hug and a big sloppy kiss every now and then. His favourite pastimes include running, fetching and talking long walks on the beach, but he’s happy to take part in any sort of game (even frisbee). Jordy isn’t that high-maintenance in terms of attention - he loves snuggling with his humans in warm or comfy places but is still relaxed and happy enough in his own company.

Portrait of a Smiling Young Woman With DogRight now, he lives in a foster home with a human who works during the day, so he’s getting very used to entertaining himself. Unlike many other excitable pups, Jordy isn’t interested in digging up the garden or chewing things, so he can be trusted to behave while you’re out and about. In his current foster home, he has free reign both inside and outside the house, and his favourite thing to do is snuggling up on the lounge when it’s time to go to bed.

Jordy is both crate- and toilet-trained and is just a very polite gentleman in general. He’s really good at travelling in cars and loves to go on adventures with his family. He has a meat allergy which means he needs to eat special grain-free fish bickies, but he likes these a lot and sits very patiently when he knows he’s about to have some for supper. He even knows how to sit, stay and drop, so he’s a pretty keen learner!

Tricolor Short Coat Dog RunningIdeally, Jordy would love to play a big role in a really active household. He doesn’t really mind if he lives with a big family, a couple or just one person, so long as he’s able to hang out with them indoors and go on outdoor adventures with them. With Jordy, you just need to put on your shoes and grab the keys and lead and he’s ready to go anywhere you’re going.

Jordy’s one special requirement is that he needs a family who will pay attention to what he’s eating because he needs to avoid eating anything he could be allergic to. In return for this little bit of extra care, he’ll be more than happy to give you all the love and fun you could possibly want! He’s even suitable for kids and loves to play with children with proper supervision. He does get very excited, though, so it’s possible he could accidentally knock a small child over if they’re not properly supervised.

Person Giving High Five to Grey CatJordy has lived as part of a big group of dogs and got on with them just fine, but he’d definitely prefer to live in a one-dog household. A polite boy like him can find other dogs a little annoying at times, especially if they’re impolite and pushy! He gets on alright with cats too and currently lives with three feline companions. He tends to find the cats interesting more than anything else, and generally only chases them if they’re already running around.

If your cats are happy to hang out with a dog without getting spooked and are generally laid back in nature, Jordy is ready to become firm friends with them. He gets on well with the three he lives with right now, who are constantly stealing his toys, teasing him and rolling around on his beds. He’s annoyed them once or twice and received the odd slap as a result, but they usually get along pretty well!

If you’re interested in getting to know Jordy a little better, head on over to his page on HAR’s website!

Reunions

Above all else, our aim is to make sure as many pets as possible get to be with families who will love them and give them all the care they need no matter what, and this includes reuniting wandering animals with their worried parents. Here are just a few of our recent success stories!

AliAli
“Great advice and tips during a stressful time for the family.
Distant neighbour found and returned our boy. We live in an amazing caring community.”

SoxSox
“Thank you all so much for your caring and supporting our search for our lost girl.
Sox was found a group of dog lovers on Monash Fwy today and they all got together to reunite us. One lady rang me to get my address, 2 men got her into the back of a car and the lovely owner of that car brought her home. We are so thankful to these people has she had travelled approx 14kms since Wednesday afternoon up Eastlink and the Monash and managed not to get hit by a car.”

ChifleyChifley
“Many thanks for your fantastic service.....a happy ending.
We knew a paid alert was the best way of maximising the prospects of his return. The Pet Network support was awesome. The immediate responses were very encouraging. Chifley was recognised by a Good Samaritan as a result of the LPF alert and returned to us.
Simply put, if you want your lost pet back, have LPF get an alert out to its membership that is on watch and vigilant.”

Dusty


Dusty
“Thanks for all the information provided and a dedicated member call I found dusty save and sound within 24hrs”


ArchieArchie
“Dog found in 2 days after a dedicated member responded to an alert after seeing my dog running the streets. There are good people in the world! So thankful to the member and Lost Pet Finders for enabling it all to happen.”

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Living with a Shy Cat Thursday 15 June 2017 @ 09:41

MistyIf there’s one thing that gets our tails in a twist, it’s hearing the term “scaredy cat” used as an insult! There’s nothing wrong with being a little shy every now and then, and a cat’s survival instinct is one of the things that makes them the unique little creatures we have come to love. Take Misty, for example. Misty is our current sponsored pet with Hunter Animal Rescue, and she’s a deeply affectionate little girl who can be a little shy from time to time. It’s one of the (many) things we love about her!

For Misty, being shy just means she can take a little while to settle into a new home, and that’s fine. It’s when your cat seems constantly on-edge, feels the need to hide and is unable to build trust with its family that you may need to worry. Most of us will have come across a cat with this level of shyness before, either as a pet of a friend or part of our own family. These special cats are often particularly common in pet shelters, either having been abandoned in frustration or converted into a shy cat through the stressful experience of living in an animal shelter.

White Brown Short Fur Cat Walking Near Boy in Brown Black Short Sleeve Shirt Riding White Red Toy If you’re thinking about adding a new furry friend to your family, it is vital that you put a great deal of thought into the type of cat you choose. Some cats are fearless and full of beans, and will fit in perfectly to a home with dogs, action, noise and children. Some cats, however, can be a little more sensitive.

A cat can be shy for any number of different reasons. Perhaps she was abused by a previous owner, or experienced a traumatic event. Maybe she wasn’t properly socialised in the first few weeks of her life. Some cats even have a genetic predisposition towards being particularly timid.

Unsurprisingly, shy cats tend to thrive in fairly calm, quiet homes more often than they do in rowdy households full of parties, shouting, children and dominant pets. If you know you’re dealing with a timid cat, it’s best to avoid sudden movements and loud noises, and it’s definitely important that the family dog doesn’t try to chase or roughhouse even if he is only playing!

Black and White Kitten on Brown TextileNever leave a new cat on her own with other pets until you’re absolutely certain the pets are comfortable with - and no threat to - each other.

Importantly, if your cat is prone to running away and hiding, you mustn’t ignore these behaviours. This most likely is not a behaviour that will go away over time, and your cat doesn’t simply need to “get used to” the things she fears. The more times it happens, the more time she’ll spend hiding, and the more difficult it will be to calm her down.

Whether or not they’re particularly shy, cats are generally sensitive to new experiences such as new sounds, smells, routines, tastes and environments. These are all things that you’ll need to take into consideration when you bring home a new cat, or if you need to send your current cat to live with someone else for a short while.

CatOften, you can make these changes a little easier for your cat to handle by setting up a special living space, even if it’s only for the first week-or-so. Try arranging her litterbox, toys, food and bedding in a spare bedroom or other unused (or at least lesser used) space, and don’t let guests bother her too much. This method will let her get used to her new conditions in her own way, at her own pace. As your cat gets used to her surroundings, you can introduce her to all of your family members one by one, making sure to keep these meetings quiet and calm.

Just like you and me, every cat is an individual and will grow and learn at its own unique speed. If it feels like it’s taking too long for your cat to overcome its shyness, don’t be discouraged! Just keep working together and your cat will be your best bud in no time at all.

Reunions

Above all else, our aim is to make sure as many pets as possible get to be with families who will love them and give them all the care they need no matter what, and this includes reuniting wandering animals with their worried parents. Here are just a few of our recent success stories!

CarlosCarlos
“was contacted on the site.”

Billy


Billy
“Billy jumped onto a person's arm in the area. His sister looked for lost parrots in Lane Cove and saw the listing. We just picked Billy up and couldn't be happier.”


NalaNala
“**UPDATE - NALA IS FOUND **

Nala was hiding in a shed.
She was too scared to make a sound for 6 days!

Thank you to the couple that saw my post and checked their house and shed.
It took me a few times calling her name for her to come out of hiding.
Please remember to check your houses and sheds for missing pets. This is a success story

Thank you to the whole community for helping me in my search for my fur baby.
She is so happy to be home. She hasn't stopped meowing!”

Simba


Simba
“his dady spent six hours roaming the streets to find him, 8 cats and one bunnie rabbit later he found him :) but the comfort of knowning a service like this exisits and the tips it gave on locating a cat were really valued”


RoxyRoxy
“It was reassuring to feel others a part of the search. Thanks to Bec for her sighting....which turned out not be Roxy. After 5 anxious days Rox came home overnight. She is so timid her disappearance was unusual and distressing. I will now be vigilant and regularly check with LPF to support others.”

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Why is my pet behaving oddly after storms? Monday 15 May 2017 @ 08:57

catThe weather can affect everyone differently, even once it seems as though everything should be back to normal. This point remains true not only for humans, but for our furry friends too. Over the past few weeks, we’ve discussed how we can keep our pets warm and safe during a storm, and some of the best ways to keep an eye on them in the event of an evacuation. Today, we want to talk about how a storm can influence your pet’s behaviour even after the weather improves.

Storms can make a whole lot of changes to your pet’s world, which can lead to a great deal of confusion. In extreme weather, the familiar landmarks and scents by which your pet navigates his world can be altered by the rain or wind. Think about our post about the magical item that is your dog’s nose:

“Sometimes it’s hard to understand how dogs can relate to the same world so differently to us, but dogs are built to interpret the world through their sense of smell. Dogs rely on their sense of smell as much as we rely on our vision.”

Short Coated Dog Between Wooden BoardsA massive amount of your dog’s brainpower is devoted entirely to interpreting the smells that surround him. While humans have a seemingly generous 6 million sensory receptor sites in our nasal cavity, our dogs hold over 100 million receptor sites, with the part of their brains dedicated to analyzing scents around 40 times larger than that of a human. So you may think your dog smells bad sometimes, but he actually smells somewhere between 1,000 and 10,000 times better than you do! A dog’s sense of smell is so powerful that, should he go blind, he will be able to adjust to his new world with significantly greater ease than a human.

Stories are shared often of pets who have managed to find their own way home from from incredible distances, but did you know that this homing instinct relies on their sense of smell? Dogs have a peculiar superpower that allows them to move each of their nostrils independently, allowing them to identify easily the direction from which an odor is coming. This means they can use their noses like their very own built-in compass!

Black and White Kitten on Brown TextileCat owners needn’t worry, however! As Lost Pet Finders user Bryna discovered, our feline friends also have a knack for tracking down their families:

“As it turns out, the night Chloe wandered off and didn’t come back, she managed to find her way back to their old house. The family had moved two streets over last October, and it would appear that Chloe was missing her old home. Discovering another cat had taken over her territory, Chloe had taken it on herself to reclaim what was once her land!”

dog, garden, outsideWith the landmarks changed and identifying scents removed, you will need to be extra-careful for some time after the storm to keep an eye on your cat and take note of any signs of stress or confusion. Similarly, when you take your dog for a walk, be sure to keep him on his leash until you are certain he feels familiar with his environment. Something as minor as a shrub or an old pot you had completely forgotten about might have been your pet’s only way of telling his home apart from any other. With it gone, you may as well have remodelled your entire home as it could be completely unrecognizable.

When you are confident that your pet has grown accustomed to his altered world, you should still exercise great care when you allow him outside. Your neighbourhood may have suffered more damage than you realise, and you can trust children and pets to discover any dangerous changes in the most painful ways possible. After a storm, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) advises that you “beware of damaged power lines, bridges, buildings, trees, and don't enter floodwaters.”

White and Tan English Bulldog Lying on Black RugAlways keep in mind that while a storm may have been simply inconvenient for you, it might have been traumatising for your pet. In this case, your pet’s coping techniques may be very different to yours. Following a storm an animal will sometimes feel as though their territory has been invaded and grow defensive or aggressive as a result. Try your best to be as patient as your can with this behaviour, and try to be aware of it until you’re sure your pet can be trusted outdoors.

If you follow these tips and your pet still goes missing after a storm, be sure to create a Pet Listing on Lost Pet Finders and check out our other pet-finding tips. Don’t panic: often, animals that go missing during or after major storms can still reappear a few weeks later.

Reunions

Above all else, our aim is to make sure as many pets as possible get to be with families who will love them and give them all the care they need no matter what, and this includes reuniting wandering animals with their worried parents. Here are just a few of our recent success stories!

simba


Simba
“his dady spent six hours roaming the streets to find him, 8 cats and one bunnie rabbit later he found him :) but the comfort of knowning a service like this exisits and the tips it gave on locating a cat were really valued”


maxMax
“The flyer was a great way to spread the word. We met many people walking around the neighborhood who had grabbed my number just in case they spotted Maxi.”

sox


Sox
“Sox has come home. Thank you for a wonderful service was reassuring to know that people in the area were made aware of my missing cat and nice to get some emails wishing me luck. Thank you”


amarniAmarni
“I had a lovely woman message me at 5:39 in the morning because she had noticed a dark cat that she doesn't usually see around run past her drive way and she called me incase the slight chance it was Amarni and it turns out it was, he had been running away back to our previous house that was only two streets away from our adress we are at now.”

millieMillie
“Along with the help of some locals who were alerted by LostPetFinders and a LOT of letterbox drops within a 1km radius, Millie was reported found to us by a lady to whom I dropped the third-last leaflet one km away :)
We are overjoyed.
She is injured and not eating yet, but we have only just come home from the vet moments ago.
My heart goes out to all those people who are missing their beloved animals. The pain for us was excruciating. Thank you Tony for your encouragement and your advice, and to the kind neighbours who phoned and texted me and urged me not to give up.”

by Tabitha Buckley on May 13

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Rehabilitating Your Previously Abused Dog: A Few More Tips Saturday 04 February 2017 @ 09:24

tan dogLast month, we talked about identifying whether or not your rescue pet was once abused, and how to go about beginning its rehabilitation. Today, we’re going to finish this series of posts by discussing a few more ideas for helping your dog in his journey to recovery.

Separation Anxiety

Just like humans, dogs are generally very sociable animals. They have a natural tendency towards living in family groups and since their domestication, they have evolved with us to work alongside us and live as smaller, furrier members of our families. This is why, given the choice, most family dogs would spend almost every waking moment in the company of their owners. Every now and then, you’ll come across a dog who prefers the company of other dogs but very, very rarely will you come across a dog who prefers to be alone.

All the same, while these sociable animals prefer the company of others and should not be left alone for long periods of time, it should be possible for you to leave them own for a short period of time without them going off the rails. If this happens, your pet is showing signs of separation anxiety.

brown cocker spanielA simple solution for a dog displaying separation anxiety is to arrange for him to have plenty of entertainment and things to do while you are away. If the problem persists, though, you may have to look into some more solutions!

Fear of Strangers

It’s common for dogs to feel uncomfortable around strangers, especially if your dog has previously suffered some form of abuse. Often, this fear is made worse by both the stranger and the owner failing to read the dog’s body language. Your dog will try to signal to you and others that he is frightened by panting without being overly warm, furrowing his brow, lowering his gaze or tensing his body. He might try licking his lips, darting his eyes or yawning. His ears will suddenly move back or he will cower or move more slowly than usual. Then there’ll be the sign that everyone knows to look for: the tail between his legs. All of these are signs that your dog is scared or anxious, and should not be ignored if you care for his wellbeing.

If your dog is showing signs of being terrified of the people you encounter, it is your responsibility to protect him from their advances, no matter how well-meaning.

blue bulldog on printBuilding Confidence

You can further improve your pup’s confidence by employing a policy of “reverse dominance”, giving him everything he needs or wants free of charge. Don’t make him work for the food, love, attention and care he needs to survive and grow. Your dog should always have access to these things at no cost.

If you feel your dog is ready to build his confidence through training, “clicker training” is a great method to use. As explained by Blue Cross:

“Clicker training is a positive training method based on rewarding an animal for good behaviour. Your pet learns to understand that the sound of the click means “that’s right” and that a food treat is coming.”

adult spaniel brown and whiteYou can find more information on this training method with Blue Cross. This training is designed to help empower your pooch by allowing him to find ways of earning awards. Often, once a pet has figured out how the game works, they’ll begin to enjoy the game itself rather than simply its rewards. As well as empowering your pet and encouraging good behaviour, this training method is a great way of improving non-verbal communication with your dog (though you may add vocal signals later in training).

While it is important that you improve your dog’s confidence and happiness, it’s also vital that you do not do this at the expense of his basic biological needs. Dogs are naturally active animals and need a healthy diet and aerobic exercise - preferably around 20-30 minutes of running exercise - every single day. 

Reunions

Above all else, our aim is to make sure as many pets as possible get to be with their perfect families, and this includes reuniting wandering animals with their worried parents. Here are just a few of our recent success stories!

mitchMitch
“This is a great service. Turns out he was stolen and ran from this place and a nice honest person looked after him until Monday of which they in turn rang the council. Thank you very much.”

cometComet
“You guys helped a lot like I called up the vets and they had already put up posters ts just the cheeky guy rocked up home this morning”

steveSteve
“Your site was great in generating flyers, thank you so much! She came back home after a wild night in Bulimba.”

pearlPearl
“A big shout out to the amazing community we live in. Santa gave me the best gift ever, our beloved PEARL is home! She flew all the way to Winston Hills & landed on the door step of a beautiful family. With the persistence & kindness of them & their neighbour, they searched on the net to find one of my many 'lost bird' ads. We received the phone call this morning & my girls & I screamed the house down with excitement.

Thank you to everyone, people we don't even know, who went for walks to try to find Pearl, and shared our ads. This just reminds me yet again of what a wonderful place/community we live in. Thanks again everyone, from the Hugo's! Xx”

emilyEmily
“From New York we used your service to lodge an alert about our lovely Emily. Within 24 hours we had been alerted that she had been found and was well. Many thanks for the service”

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Leaving Your Pet Alone: Bobby is reunited Monday 01 August 2016 @ 10:00

BobbyThis week, we read about the reunion of the beautiful Bobby with her family.

Jeremy got Bob as a pound dog 9 years ago, when she was only around six months old. One morning, at 1 a.m., Jeremy experienced absolute horror when he discovered that Bobby had gone missing. Like any dog owner, he was concerned for her wellbeing, but the situation was made all the more urgent by the fact that Bobby was not used to being on her own and had no idea of the area, having only moved to the area four months before.

Jeremy and his family left the gate open and began their search, but to no avail. The next day, he walked all the streets, before attaching signs to his car bearing her description and driving all over his suburb from dawn to dusk. Bobby was registered with various pet sites, and posters of her were stuck up all over the area.

Thank you for doing this. It really does help.

Bobby and Jeremy were eventually reunited, thanks to Jeremy’s refusal to give up - a happy ending to an issue which affects all too many pet owners.

See more information on Bobby's reunion on imgur and 9news.

So how can you protect yourself and your pet from this situation?

BobbyHow to help your pet get used to being alone

Losing your pet is always stressful. But this stress is even further amplified when you’re painfully aware of the fact that they’ve never spent time alone before. While dogs shouldn’t be left alone for too long, it’s important that they’re able to cope by themselves every now and then, because you can’t always be there to watch them.

Your first step in this branch of training is deciding where you want to leave your dog alone. A common preference here is a kitchen or utility room, and these are generally the rooms which will be easiest to clean in the case of unexpected messes. This is an acceptable choice, although it’s important not to make the mistake of only bringing your dog into this area when you’re leaving them. Your pet needs to be left in an area where they are relaxed and comfortable, and not one which they have come to associate with anxiety and isolation.

Once you have chosen an area and made it a safe and comfortable space for your pet, you’re ready to begin training. This can be done in five, fairly simple steps:

  1. Begin by encouraging your pet to go to their bed and stay there with you for a while. Once they have waited quietly in their bed for some time, reward them.
  2. Call your pet to their bed again, this time slowly moving away. If they stay quietly, return and reward them.
  3. Repeat this step, moving a little further and staying away a little longer each time. The extent to which you increase the distance and time each time will depend on your pet, with some requiring a much slower pace than others. If your pet reacts or moves from its bed, don’t reward it and repeat the previous stage until it is ready.
  4. Begin going out through the door before returning to reward your pet. Next, go outside and shut the door behind you. Repeat this, going out for a little longer each time. Always return to reward your pet between each trip.
  5. When you reach the stage where your pet can happily be left alone for up to an hour, you should be able to comfortably be able to leave them alone for longer periods. Always remember to leave your pet something to play with or keep them busy while you’re out, otherwise they may be inclined to get up to no good!

DogDon’t let your pet get bored!

If your pet has a habit of causing mischief when they’re left alone, there’s a pretty high likelihood that they’re getting bored while you’re out of the house. Here are a few of our top tips for keeping them entertained while they’re alone:

  • Give your pet a suitable toy (or bone) to keep them occupied while you’re out of the house. You can make this their special toy by only giving it to them when they’re alone or separated from you for some reason.
  • Leave your pet special food to keep them occupied, such as cheese or peanut butter mixed in with their biscuits, or a meat-flavoured chew.
  • Invest in a treat ball, cube or puzzle which you can fill with dry treats - something your pet will have to work or play with in order to get to the treats.
  • These treats and toys will keep your pet busy by giving them mental stimulation. Any other toy which will mentally stimulate your pet can also work!

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